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17 Dec 2018

Tech innovations That Will Change The Way We Travel

Until travellers stop choosing flights based mostly on price, rewards status, and the best-of-direct options, airlines won’t dramatically improve the air-travel experience. There just isn’t a great business case for carriers—which are enjoying record profits—to invest in improved services if they’re not going to enhance their bottom line. To wit, American Airlines earned $2.7 billion last year, a bonanza it’s sharing in the form of free sandwiches to economy passengers—as long as they’re on nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco or Los Angeles.

That being said, these five tech innovations (all of which were discussed at the Millennial 20/20 summit in New York earlier this month) benefit both airline and traveler. And, as such, seem likely to be on your phone, on the ground, or in the air in the not-too-distant future.

Until travellers stop choosing flights based mostly on price, rewards status, and the best-of-direct options, airlines won’t dramatically improve the air-travel experience. There just isn’t a great business case for carriers—which are enjoying record profits—to invest in improved services if they’re not going to enhance their bottom line. To wit, American Airlines earned $2.7 billion last year, a bonanza it’s sharing in the form of free sandwiches to economy passengers—as long as they’re on nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco or Los Angeles.

That being said, these five tech innovations (all of which were discussed at the Millennial 20/20 summit in New York earlier this month) benefit both airline and traveler. And, as such, seem likely to be on your phone, on the ground, or in the air in the not-too-distant future.

Tech innovations that will change the way we fly

Until travellers stop choosing flights based mostly on price, rewards status, and the best-of-direct options, airlines won’t dramatically improve the air-travel experience. There just isn’t a great business case for carriers—which are enjoying record profits—to invest in improved services if they’re not going to enhance their bottom line. To wit, American Airlines earned $2.7 billion last year, a bonanza it’s sharing in the form of free sandwiches to economy passengers—as long as they’re on nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco or Los Angeles.

That being said, these five tech innovations (all of which were discussed at the Millennial 20/20 summit in New York earlier this month) benefit both airline and traveler. And, as such, seem likely to be on your phone, on the ground, or in the air in the not-too-distant future.

Until travellers stop choosing flights based mostly on price, rewards status, and the best-of-direct options, airlines won’t dramatically improve the air-travel experience. There just isn’t a great business case for carriers—which are enjoying record profits—to invest in improved services if they’re not going to enhance their bottom line. To wit, American Airlines earned $2.7 billion last year, a bonanza it’s sharing in the form of free sandwiches to economy passengers—as long as they’re on nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco or Los Angeles.

That being said, these five tech innovations (all of which were discussed at the Millennial 20/20 summit in New York earlier this month) benefit both airline and traveler. And, as such, seem likely to be on your phone, on the ground, or in the air in the not-too-distant future.

Until travellers stop choosing flights based mostly on price, rewards status, and the best-of-direct options, airlines won’t dramatically improve the air-travel experience. There just isn’t a great business case for carriers—which are enjoying record profits—to invest in improved services if they’re not going to enhance their bottom line. To wit, American Airlines earned $2.7 billion last year, a bonanza it’s sharing in the form of free sandwiches to economy passengers—as long as they’re on nonstop flights between New York and San Francisco or Los Angeles.

That being said, these five tech innovations (all of which were discussed at the Millennial 20/20 summit in New York earlier this month) benefit both airline and traveler. And, as such, seem likely to be on your phone, on the ground, or in the air in the not-too-distant future.

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